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DJpowerHaus
PostPosted: Thu May 05, 2005 12:03 pm  Reply with quote
Sir Post A Lot


Joined: 07 Apr 2004
Posts: 1772
Location: Hereford Zone, MD

I've been trying to learn alot about the history of Mitusbishi.... especially the motors. I thought I'd start an ongoing thread where we can all enlighten ourselves on the mitsubishi family. I still consider this a drop in the bucket of the international info on Mitusibshi Engines. Consider this to be an adventure into the Japanese-American-European automotive business following WWII.

I dont claim to have written but a tiny bit of this. All of it is plagurized, but I'll try to link to the sources:

Wikipedia
http://www.wikipedia.org

And some more info is available at Mitsubishi Web Museum http://www.mitsubishi-motors.com/corporate/museum/e/index.html

Its strange to find just how many companies have been intertwined with Mitsu over the years: Chrysler, DSM, GEMA, Hyundai, Mazda, Ford, BMW (Mini), Mercedes Benz, Porsche, Rover.. etc.

Naming
Mitsubishi Motors uses a simple four-digit naming scheme for its automobile engines:

The first digit signifies the number of cylinders
The second is the fuel type; "G" for gasoline, "R" for race fuel?, "D" for Diesel
The third is the engine family
The fourth is the engine model
The first digit is sometimes omitted shifting the entire scheme by one to make room for another character. It is rumored that "T" is for turbocharged and "B" for second-generation.

Families
Mitsubishi has developed five families of straight-4 engines:

4G1x "Orion" - 1.2 L to 1.5 L
4G3x "Saturn" - 1.2 L to 1.8 L
4G5x "Astron" - 2.0 L to 2.6 L "Silent Shaft" <--- G54B
4G6x "Sirius" - 1.6 L to 2.4 L <--- 4G63
4G9x - 1.6 L to 2.0 L

Orion
The Mitsubishi Orion.. cant find much information. Displacement ranges from 1.2 L to 1.5 L.

4G11
The 4G11 displaces 1.2 L (1244 cc).

4G12
The 4G12 displaces 1.4 L (1410 cc).

4G13
The 4G13 displaces 1.3 L (1298 cc). It is an SOHC engine.
Applications:
Mitsubishi Saga
Mitsubishi Iswara
Mitsubishi Wira
Mitsubishi Satria

4G15
The SOHC 4G15 displaces 1.5 L (1468 cc).
Applications:
Mitsubishi Saga
Mitsubishi Iswara
Mitsubishi Wira
Mitsubishi Satria

4G16
The 4G16 displaces 1.2 L (1198 cc).

Saturn
Hard to find much info on anything but the legendary Rally cars using the 1.6L model. Displacement ranges from 1.4 L to 1.8 L.

4G31
Mitsubishi's first OHC Saturn motor. The 4G31 displaces 1.5 L (1499 cc). It is an 8-valve SOHC design
Applications:
Colt Galant AIIGS

Marketed since December 1969 as an advance personal car, its popular features were high performance and the original 'Dyna-wedge line' styling. The success of the Colt Galant represented an important step forward for Mitsubishi Motors and it was the first of the company's products to be exported to North America. There were three variants -- the A1, A2 and A2GS -- depending on engine specification. The car in the photograph is an AIIGS using Mitsubishi's first OHC Saturn engine, with a maximum speed of 175km/h. There were competition successes for the Colt Galant in both domestic and international rallies, including an overall victory for the 16L-GS in the 7th Southern Cross Rally in 1972.

4G32
The 4G32 displaces 1.6 L (1597 cc). It is an 8-valve SOHC design.
Applications:
Mitsubishi Lancer 1600 GSR

First appearing on the market in February 1973, the Lancer bore the slogan, 'respect for humanity.' The range has since expanded to 12 models, with engine capacities between 1200cc and 1600cc, all with a rigid monocoque body, low emission engines, a tilting steering wheel with an emergency collapsible function and power-assisted disc brakes. In August of the same year, seven more models were added, including the fastest of the range, the 1600GSR, which is capable of 0-400m in 16.4 seconds. The photograph shows a production version of the 1600GSR which in 1974 was changed in minor details. The 1600GSR played an important role in international motorsport, winning the Safari Rally overall twice, in 1974 and 1976, and (starting in 1973) taking four consecutive overall wins in the Southern Cross. The rally car shown in the photograph is the 1974 Safari winner (1973 model).

Here is more info on the same car from Glen Edmond's Page: http://www.eastafricansafarirally.com/info_pages/carsale1.htm

Light weight, compact and reliable thanks to its engineering simplicity, the Mitsubishi Lancer cut a swathe through the road-going vehicle market when introduced in February 1973. It's smooth sporting lines signalled superb performance under the skin, and it was on this base that the sporting version, the Lancer 1600 GSR, was based, combining the Lancer's inherent qualities of strength and high performance with the experience gained through seven years of successful competition with the Colt and Galant.

Fondly remembered as the "A73 Lancer", the Lancer 1600 GSR was an immediate success in rallying, taking a remarkable 1-2-3-4 victory in the 8th Southern Cross Rally in October that year. And the victor? One Andrew Cowan, a man who would be part of the Lancer success story for many years to come. But it was during the following year that the Lancer really made its mark on the world stage. While events such as the Southern Cross had a world-wide reputation, a manufacturer couldn't truly claim rally superiority until it had won a World Championship event.

Mitsubishi chose the toughest of all, the Safari Rally, held in Kenya, Africa, in which to launch the Lancer onto the world scene. And what a glorious success it was! Few manufacturers have ever enjoyed such a remarkable feat as Mitsubishi did in 1974 when, on its world debut, the Lancer strode confidently to a maiden victory at the hands of Joginder Singh. It's remarkable to note that the 1600cc Lancer beat Bjorn Waldegaard's Porsche 911 which boasted 2600cc, proving that the light, compact reliable Lancer could beat all-comers. It was a momentous occasion, and one which started a love affair between Mitsubishi and this great classic event.

The Safari Rally enjoys a reputation as an extremely tough event. It ranks as one of the most famous rallies in the world and, at the time of the Mitsubishi Lancer's memorable 1974 victory, the event was the biggest rally in the FIA World Rally Championship, stretching over five days and a gruelling 6,000 km. The Safari was, and is, regarded as a real "car-breaker", a term coined by rally followers for those events one is lucky to finish in one piece, never mind win.

To contest such an event successfully, a driver needed a car that he could rely upon totally, even in the harshest conditions, and combine that resilience and reliability with speed and performance. Clearly, the Mitsubishi Lancer combined those rare qualities with great success. Singh gave the Lancer the most praise when he said: "To win the Safari Rally your machinery must have the best performance and superior handling, as well as strength, ease of maintenance and simple design. I believe I won this race because of the Lancer. This victory will remain a vivid memory throughout my life and the Lancer will surely become a lifelong friend. I was lucky to be able to drive such a reliable machine." Singh went on to repeat that success with a further win with the Lancer on the 1976 Safari Rally, heading a Mitsubishi 1-2-3 and beating the World Championship winning Lancia Stratos in the process.

During this time the Lancer went on to dominate the Southern Cross Rally in Australia, which became the scene of yet another famous driver's debut, that of Kenjiro Shinozuka, Japan's first rallying superstar. Having already enjoyed success on domestic events in Japan,Shinozuka drove his first international event at the wheel of a Lancer on the Southern Cross, where Andrew Cowan was the acknowledged master and went on to win a further three of these great events in a row in the Lancer. By this time the Mitsubishi Lancer was developing a reputation for being invincible at home in Japan and abroad. Indeed, in Africa it had gained the sobriquet "The King of Cars." It seemed that everyone who drove a Lancer prospered from its superior performance, especially over rough and arduous rallies where it undoubtedly excelled.

While Shinozuka's loss of concentration after losing his way on his first Southern Cross Rally resulted in retirement after leaving the road, his first world championship experience on the 24th Safari Rally gave cause for celebration when he won the Best Driver award for finishing sixth overall, joining such luminaries as Hannu Mikkola, Shekhar Mehta and Joginder Singh. By the time Andrew Cowan won the Southern Cross yet again in 1976, the Lancer had clocked up six wins overall and including Cowan's class victory on the 1975 Safari, a grand total of seven major international awards. Lancers also dominated the Bandama Rally in 1977, with Cowan and Singh beating the works Peugeot 504s, but with this event, the endurance era drew to a close.


Major Results:

International
1973 Southern Cross Rally 1st
1974 Safari Rally (WRC) 1st
1974 Southern Cross Rally 1st
1975 Safari Rally (WRC) 4th
1975 Southern Cross Rally 1st
1976 Safari Rally (WRC) 1st
1976 Southern Cross Rally 1st
1977 Southern Cross Rally 4th
1977 Southern Cross Rally 4th
1977 Bandama Rally 1st

The 4G32 has also appeared in this awesome Mitsubishi: The Galant GTO

Inspired by aircraft shapes and details, the Galant GTO earned widespread recognition as the 'Hip up coupe.' The MI and MII versions went on the market in November 1970 and the MR in December. With features that included a unique long nose and duck tail, together with 50 inch curved side windows, its styling (distinctive for a domestic model) generated overwhelming enthusiasm at the Tokyo Motor Show. The cockpit-type dashboard had a strong influence on design at rival domestic car manufacturers. The GTO shown in the photograph is the MR, the boldest of three available variants. It was fitted with Mitsubishi's first production DOHC engine.

4G33
The 4G33 displaces 1.4 L (1439 cc).

4G36
The 4G36 displaces 1.2 L (1238 cc).

4G37
The 8-valve SOHC 4G37 displaces 1.8 L (1755 cc).
Applications:
Mitsubishi Cordia
Retrieved from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mitsubishi_Saturn_engine

Astron

The Mitsubishi Astron, our pride and joy. Engine displacement ranges up to 2.6 litre (one of the largest four cylinder engines of its time (?)). It powered models such as the Mitsubishi Pajero/Montero, Mitsubishi Sigma and Mitsubishi Magna, Mitsubishi Starion, Dodge Conquest.

It employs a chain driven single overhead camshaft (SOHC) and has 8 valves (two per cylinder). In 2.6 L (4G54) Astron II EFI guise (used in the TN Magna) it produced 93 kW at 4800 revolutions per minute and 205 N·m at a low 2300 rpm.

In 1975, the Astron featured a modern balance shaft system, dubbed "Silent Shaft". The 2.6 was praised for its smoothness and strong low-end torque, but later in its life its power and (never great) economy was eclipsed by newer (many of them DOHC) engines.

4G52
The 4G52 displaces 2.0 L (1995 cc).
Applications:
1979-1989 Dodge Ram 50

4G54
The SOHC 8-valve 4G54 aka G54B displaces 2.6 L (2555 cc). It was designed for longitudinal use in rear wheel drive and all wheel drive vehicles. (and therefore has the "wide" 13.25" lower bellhousing pattern)
Applications:
1979-1989 Dodge Ram 50
1987-1988 Mazda B2600

4G55
The 4G55 displaces 2.3 L (2346 cc).

Mazda and Mitusbishi (and Ford)
The Mark 5 B2600 Pickup Truck
Production: 1985–1991
A new Proceed/B-Series was introduced in 1985 (1986 in the United States) and was produced until 1991. A 4-speed automatic transmission was the primary choice, with a 5-speed manual transmission through 1989. Part-time four wheel drive was another option.

5/87-5/88
2555cc (2.6L)
VIN Code: E
Chrysler, Mitsubishi, Hyundai, D-50, Montero, B2600, G54B,
RWD, MCA Jet Head, Hydraulic rockers,
13.25" Across Bellhousing Bolts,
ST trans. 1/83-4/86 Stk. 5/86 up AT or Std.

The 2.6L Mitsubishi-powered B2600 was introduced in 1986, though the United States introduction lagged by a year. 1987 saw the Mazda straight-4 enlarged to 2.2 L in the B2200, with the smaller engine phased out after that year. The Mitsubishi engine was gone for 1988 (1989 in the United States), replaced by a new family of Mazda powerplants. The G54B was replaced with the "G6" engine:

8/88-95
2606cc (2.6L)
VIN Code: G6
Ford, Mercury, Mazda, G6 Engine, 8/88-95 MPV, 11/88-93 B2600,
FI, 12 Valve, Balance shaft, Hydraulic lifters, WP.
If '86-88 B2600, see Mitsubishi G54B engine 2610.2.

Mazda pattern: G6
Mitsu pattern: G54B

This information is VERY interesting to us RWD people... and goes deep into Mitsubishi's relationship with Mazda.... and even Ford.

From the first B-Series pickup truck, Mazda has used the engine displacement to determine the name. Thus, the B1500 had a 1.5 liter engine, and the new B4000 has a 4.0 liter V6. For 2002, the name was changed to simply Mazda Truck in the United States. In Japan, Mazda uses the Proceed name on its compact pickup trucks, and another line of larger trucks is available called the Mazda Titan. Other names used for this line include Mazda Bravo (Australia), Mazda Bounty (New Zealand), and Mazda Drifter (South Africa).

Mazda's partnership with Ford has resulted in the sharing of this vehicle—the Mazda B-Series and Ford Ranger are essentially the same. In Australia and New Zealand, since the 1970s, the Ford Courier name is also used and the line continues today.

However, it should be borne in mind that the Mazda B-Series and Ford Ranger twins found inside North America are unrelated to the ones sold elsewhere. These are engineered by Mazda, whereas the North American models are developed by Ford.

The Ranger has used transmissions from both Mazda and Mitsusbishi including the Mitusibishi FM132 and the Mazda Model R
http://www.therangerstation.com/tech_library/ManualTransmission.html

Mazda Model R Transmission
href='http://members.aol.com/solomiata/Drivetrain.html
The turbo trans (AKA 'Type 3' or Model 'R' ) was derived from the original, and more robust, RX-2 through RX-4 5 speed Type 1 trans. It also has many internal design similarities to the Type 2. It mainly differs from the Type 2 in the input and output shafts grew from 15/16" to 1", a removable bellhousing and the case having strengthening ribs instead of being smooth. For more turbo trans info go to the links page and click on Mazdatrix and Felix's. A variant of the turbo trans has been used in Ford light duty '88-91 F-150, Bronco and Ranger trucks. It is model M50D-R2 and also known as the "Kogyo"

'R' gear ratio's
Car 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th
1988-89 929 3.483:1 2.015:1 1.391:1 1:1 .762:1
1987-88 TII 3.483:1 2.015:1 1.391:1 1:1 .762:1
1989-91 TII 3.483:1 2.015:1 1.391:1 1:1 .719:1
1993-95 FD3S 3.483:1 2.015:1 1.391:1 1:1 .719:1
89-93 B2600 3.730:1 2.158:1 1.396:1 1:1 .816:1
(from http://members.aol.com/solomiata/Drivetrain.html )

As you can see from the table the RWD 626 offers the closest gear ratio's from 3rd to 5th, making it a great road race transmission. It is however from the early pre-improvement generation, making it susceptible to breakage. This "improvement" happened somewhere in the TurboII years. The Series 5 RX7 transmissions are regarded by most to be the strongest... putting the split around 1988.

The inferences made in this section point to the Mitsubishi RWD (wideblock) bellhousing using the 87-88 model year B2600 bellhousing and thus the RX7 Turbo II Model R transmissions.



Due to the scope of this article, we'll stop at bellhousings. For more details on B2600/RX7/Mitsubishi Wideblocks check out this page on main site: http://projectzerog.com/rx7transmissions.shtml

Sirius
Quote:
Sirius, the "Dog Star," is the brightest star of the constellation which bears the Latin name Canis Major -- the Greater Dog. It is also the unquestionable ruler in its own section of the sky; a truly dazzling object.
from
http://www.space.com/spacewatch/050429_canis_major.html

4G61
The 4G61 normally displaces 1.6 L, but there are two distinct variations: An earlier version uses 3.03x3.39 in bore and stroke, while a later one has moved to 3.24x2.95 in. This engine was always DOHC 16-valve and used either ECFI or MPFI fuel injection. A turbocharged version was also produced for the Mirage. This motor DOES NOT HAVE BALANCE SHAFTS. The parts used by the factory to eliminate the balance shafts are what can be used on the other 4G6x motors to do the same (stubby shaft, blockoff bearings, balance shaft seal).
Applications:
3.03x3.39
1989 Mitsubishi Mirage ECFI
1989-1990 Dodge Colt MPI
3.24x2.95
1990-1992 Mitsubishi Mirage MPFI

4G62
The larger 1.8 L 4G62 was an SOHC 8-valve unit for longitudinal RWD/4WD use. With a 3.17x3.46 in bore and stroke, it displaces 1795 cc.
Applications:
1988 Mitsubishi Cordia
1988 Mitsubishi Tredia

4G63
The 4G63 was a 2.0 L (1997 cc) version. Again, there were two different bore and stroke versions, and both SOHC and DOHC were produced. It is found in various Mitsubishi models including the Eclipse and Galant but also appears in Chrysler-branded versions of the Eclipse: the Eagle Talon and Plymouth Laser.

Although this is unverified, I think I'll still include it:
Quote:
Note that the 4G63 block in the Eclipse and Galant (and other Mitsubishi and Chrysler passenger cars) is not identical to the 4G63 block found in the Mitsubishi Mighty Max and Dodge Ram 50. The car-bound 4G63 has a bore and stroke of 3.35 in (85 mm) and 3.46 in (88 mm), whereas the truck 4G63 has a bore and stroke of 3.31 in (84 mm) and 3.54 in (90 mm).


Output for the US-spec 2004 Mitsubishi Lancer Evolution is 271 hp (202 kW) at 6500 RPM with 273 ft.lbf (370 Nm) of torque at 3500 RPM. It has a cast iron engine block and aluminum DOHC cylinder heads. It uses MPI multi-point fuel injection, has 4 valves per cylinder, is turbocharged and intercooled and features forged steel connecting rods.

In the United Kingdom, a special Lancer Evolution, the FQ-400, produces 302.13 kW (405.2 hp), from a 4G63 engine. At 202.9 hp (151.3 kW) per liter, it has possibly the highest specific output per liter of any production engine.

Racing
Its turbocharged variant, 4G63T (also sometimes referred to simply as the 4G63), has powered Mitsubishi vehicles in World Rally Championships for years in the Galant VR-4, Lancer Evolution, Carisma GT and Lancer WRC04. It was the powerplant of the Lancer Evolution when Tommi Mäkinen won his four sequential WRC championships. The engine is also used in a variety of turbocharged 2-liter models of Galant and Eclipse.

Applications:
3.31x3.54 SOHC 2-barrel carburetor
1988-1989 Mitsubishi Mighty-Max
1988-1989 Dodge Ram 50
3.35x3.46 SOHC carburetor
1988 Mitsubishi Cordia
1988 Mitsubishi Tredia
3.35x3.46 SOHC MPFI
1988-1992 Dodge Colt Vista
1989-1992 Mitsubishi Galant
3.35x3.46 DOHC MPFI
1989-1992 Mitsubishi Galant
1990-1999 Mitsubishi Eclipse
1990-1999 Plymouth Laser
1990-1999 Eagle Talon
Mitsubishi Starion (Not USA)

4G64
The longitudinal 4G64 was the largest variant, at 2.4 L (2350 cc). Early models were 8-valve SOHC, but a later 16-valve DOHC version was also produced. All used MPFI with a 3.41 in (86.5 mm) bore and 3.94 in (100 mm) stroke.

A later 4G64, built in Shiga, Japan, was used as recently as 2004 in transverse applications. It has an cast iron engine block and aluminum SOHC cylinder heads. It uses SFI fuel injection, has 4 valves per cylinder with roller followers and features a one-piece cast camshaft cast and aluminum intake manifold.

The version used in the Chrysler Sebring/Stratus coupes produced 147 hp (110 kW) at 5500 RPM with 158 ft.lbf (214 Nm) of torque at 4000 RPM. The Chrysler version features fracture-split forged powder metal connecting rods.

The Lancer Ralliart/Eclipse version uses forged steel connecting rods. Output is 162 hp (121 kW) at 5500 RPM with 162 ft.lbf (260 Nm) of torque at 4000 RPM.
Applications:
1988 Mitsubishi Galant
1988-1990 Mitsubishi Van
1990-1992 Mitsubishi Pick-Up
1990-1992 Dodge Ram 50
Mitsubishi Lancer Ralliart
Mitsubishi Eclipse/Chrysler Sebring/Dodge Stratus

4G67
The 16-valve DOHC 4G67 displaced 1.8 L (1836 cc).
Applications:
Mitsubishi Mirage

4G69
The 4G69 is a 2.4 L (2378 cc) version built in Shiga, Japan. Bore is 87 mm and stroke is 100 mm. Output is 160 hp (119 kW) at 5750 RPM with 162 ft.lbf (289 Nm) of torque at 4000 RPM. It has an cast iron engine block and aluminum SOHC cylinder heads. It uses MFI fuel injection, has 4 valves per cylinder with roller followers and features forged steel connecting rods, a one-piece cast camshaft, and a cast aluminum intake manifold.
Applications:
2004 Mitsubishi Galant
2004 Mitsubishi Outlander

V6 Mitsubishi Engines
This thread is mainly about the I4 motors, but I found this and had to pust it.

The 6A1x series is a V6 piston engine from Mitsubishi Motors. The 1.6 L 6A10 holds the distinction of being the smallest modern production V6.

6A10
With the engine capacity of only 1.6 L (1597 cc), this is the smallest yet most powerful 1.6 L engine available on production car. With the configuration of 6 cylinders, dual overhead cam (DOHC), and 4 valves per cylinder, the 6A10 engine manages to output 140 hp (104 kW) @ 7000 rpm in stock condition.

Available in the Mitsubishi Lancer MX in 1992, this engine was once the most sought after engine for modification in Japan. In 1994, the Kotsumi's brothers from Kanagawa, Japan, managed to turn the 1.6 litre engine into a 'little monster' able to produce 430 bhp (320 kW) @ 6000 rpm without a forced induction system.

Specifications
Displacement: 1597 cc
Power: 140 PS (103 kW) @ 7000 rpm
Torque: 147 Nm @ 4500 rpm
Power density: 7.71
Engine type: V type 6 cylinder DOHC 24 valve
Fuel system: ECI multiple (electrically controlled gasoline injection)
Fuel type: Unleaded premium gasoline
Compression ratio: 10
Bore: 73 mm
Stroke: 63.6 mm
Fuel consumption at 10-15 modes: 8.3 L/100 km

6A12
The 2.0 L (1997 cc) 6A12 is less notable than its little brother. It was available with and without the MIVEC variable valve timing system and was a DOHC 24-valve engine.
Applications:
Mitsubishi FTO
Mitsubishi Eterna

6A13
Development continued with the 2.5 L (2498 cc) 6A13.

Diesel
This is a collection of the Diesel Engines mentioned above as well as some more. Looks like I need to add a 6cyl section to this thread!
4D55
2.3L (2346 cc) Diesel truck motor offered 83-85. Based on the Astron (5) Family of motors. Wideblock.

Applications:
Mitsubishi Mighty Max (83-85)
Dodge D-50 pickups (83-85)
Ford Rangers (85-87)

4D56
2.5L Diesel truck motor. Based on the Astron (5) Family of motors. Wideblock

4D65
1.8L Diesel motor FWD. Based on Sirius (6) Family of motors. Narrowblock.
http://www.dsmtuners.com/forums/attachment.php?attachmentid=39169&stc=1 http://www.dsmtuners.com/forums/attachment.php?attachmentid=39168&stc=1

4D68
2.0L Diesel motor FWD. Based on Sirius (6) Family of motors. Narrowblock.


6D22 & 6D22T

6D24 & 6D24T

I'm looking for more info on Diesel and Race Fuel motors if anybody can find any facts.[/b]


Last edited by DJpowerHaus on Tue Apr 04, 2006 9:47 pm; edited 3 times in total

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Getting the engine bolted in is about 10% of the way there.
The next 80% can go quickly with help and skill.
That last 10% takes about as long as the 90% that came before it.
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DJpowerHaus
PostPosted: Thu May 05, 2005 1:18 pm  Reply with quote
Sir Post A Lot


Joined: 07 Apr 2004
Posts: 1772
Location: Hereford Zone, MD

I'm still looking for info on the "R69B" engine. I cannot find it ANYWHERE.


"Galant GTOR73-X"(1972) prototype was equipped with a detuned 'R69B' engine.

http://www.autoblog.com/photos/mitsubishi-galant-gto-r73-x/full/

I am SLOWLY finding info now... on the R series engines.. Formula Engines. So that Galant has a Formula car motor in it.. wow.

A GP would be even so organised in 1970, under the name of "JAPAN AUTOMOBILE FEDERATION G.P." in Formule libre. In fact It appeared to be F2 with engine-blocks which should not be specially derived from a production-based cars.

There was an article in Sport-Auto December 1976 about the history of motor racing in Japan written by Shigemi Kanda translated by some unknown person on the Internet:

Quote:
Jackie Stewart won the race in a Brabham BT30 entered by John Coombs. Kuniomi Nagamatsu finished third in a Mitsubishi Colt F2-D. Mitsubishi had some experience in the single-seaters and the first Colt F3 was seen in demonstration the day of the third Japanese GP in 1966. The engine was a overturned 4 cylinder - 997 cc - which developed 90 HP and the chassis was multi-tubular inspired by Brabham. Mitsubishi developed afterwards his engine R39 1958 cc which was put in the first Colt F2B. In 1971 the capacity of the engine was increased to 1994 cc. The Colt F-2D with the 2-litre engine R39B-type would win the 1971 Japanese GP with Nagamatsu but the foreign competitions were not so strong as the previous year. In 1972 the Europeans came back in force, John Surtees winning the race in his TS10 with a BDA engine.


R28 (998cc)
Applications:
Colt Formula F3A

In 1966, Mitsubishi pioneered the production of formula cars with the F3A. Using a chassis made by Brabham and gearbox by Hewland, the F3A was powered by the R28 type engine with two twin-choke Mikuni Solex 40PHH carburetors. In 1966 it took outright victory in the 3rd Japan Grand Prix Exhibition Race, driven by Osamu Mochizuki. One year later, in the hands of Hiroshi Hasegawa, it took a class win in the 4th Japan Grand Prix Formula Car Race.


R39B 2.0L(1994cc)
Applications:
Colt Formula F2000

This racing single-seater won the Japan Grand Prix on May 3,1971 in the hands of Kuniomi Nagamatsu. It was powered by a R39B engine developed especially for racing. It was also fitted with side radiators, which have since become a feature of all modern formula cars. This was to be the last single-seater competition car made by Mitsubishi.

I was lucky enough to see the F2000 in person in 2008 at Detroid MOD. My photos are at the end of this gallery: https://picasaweb.google.com/DJpowerHaus/MotownMOD2008#


Last edited by DJpowerHaus on Sun Jan 29, 2012 2:18 pm; edited 3 times in total

_________________

Getting the engine bolted in is about 10% of the way there.
The next 80% can go quickly with help and skill.
That last 10% takes about as long as the 90% that came before it.
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carguyf545
PostPosted: Sun Sep 04, 2005 12:02 pm  Reply with quote
Addict


Joined: 26 Jul 2005
Posts: 175
Location: centralia WA.

to much useful info for my brain to take in, in all confused now. maybe im thinking to hard

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what a nice port job, probally hurt it more than i helped it.
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smog
PostPosted: Wed Apr 05, 2006 7:13 pm  Reply with quote
Sir Post A Lot


Joined: 29 Oct 2004
Posts: 894

lol good info, We can cal the mitsubishi van in the states the starwagon over seas. I believe the ls300 van from aus was also mated with a 4g63 and 4g64. Not sure about the ls200, or the delica 4x4 vans.

_________________
84, 85, and 86 lancer ex 1800 gsr turbos
81 Challenger "galant" g54bT 14b
87 mirage turbo 4g63t swapped
78 lancer coupe g54bT
88 minicab van estate supercharged
80s hero
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lonestarion
PostPosted: Sun Mar 18, 2007 4:11 pm  Reply with quote
Knowlege Seeker


Joined: 11 Mar 2007
Posts: 8

the SIRUS was also a 12 valve 2.0 that i think was only availible in japan.
its the only place i have seen them go up on auctions. sure would be SWEEEEET if we could get that 12v head on our 2.6 :twisted:
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Group_B
PostPosted: Sun Mar 25, 2007 12:49 am  Reply with quote
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Joined: 23 Mar 2007
Posts: 8
Location: Boulder Creek, Ca

The Delica Exceed and Super Exceed vans were equipped with either the 4D55 or 4D56 turbo diesels and a 2.8l turbo diesel that I don't know the designation of.
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Mad Menace
PostPosted: Sun May 09, 2010 2:34 pm  Reply with quote
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Joined: 11 Nov 2009
Posts: 214
Location: Colorado

Quote:
4G64
The longitudinal 4G64 was the largest variant, at 2.4 L (2350 cc). Early models were 8-valve SOHC, but a later 16-valve DOHC version was also produced. All used MPFI with a 3.41 in (86.5 mm) bore and 3.94 in (100 mm) stroke.

A later 4G64, built in Shiga, Japan, was used as recently as 2004 in transverse applications. It has an cast iron engine block and aluminum SOHC cylinder heads. It uses SFI fuel injection, has 4 valves per cylinder with roller followers and features a one-piece cast camshaft cast and aluminum intake manifold.

The version used in the Chrysler Sebring/Stratus coupes produced 147 hp (110 kW) at 5500 RPM with 158 ft.lbf (214 Nm) of torque at 4000 RPM. The Chrysler version features fracture-split forged powder metal connecting rods.

The Lancer Ralliart/Eclipse version uses forged steel connecting rods. Output is 162 hp (121 kW) at 5500 RPM with 162 ft.lbf (260 Nm) of torque at 4000 RPM.
Applications:
1988 Mitsubishi Galant
1988-1990 Mitsubishi Van
1990-1992 Mitsubishi Pick-Up
1990-1992 Dodge Ram 50
Mitsubishi Lancer Ralliart
Mitsubishi Eclipse/Chrysler Sebring/Dodge Stratus


This engine also came in a DOHC variant in the 94 Galant GS model and was used up until 1996 in the Mitsubishi Mighty Max.

Specs for the 94 Galant GS.

Mitsubishi Motor Corp has added a higher horsepower engine and stiffened up the suspension on its 1994 Galant GS automobile. Besides the basic 2.4 liter 4-cylinder engine, a 160-hp dual overhead cam version is now available. The 1994 Galant suspension system, which surpasses the standard MacPherson struts found on most cars, incorporates a 4-wheel multilink suspension system consisting of an upper A-arm and two lower transverse links connected by an upright link.

4G64 Engine Specs
Type: DOHC 16-valve 2.4L 4-cyl.
with cast iron block and aluminum
alloy head, timing belt driven, normally aspirated,
balance shaft
Displacement: 2351cc (143.4 CID)
Bore x Stroke: 86.5 x 100mm
(3.41 x 3.94 in.)
Horsepower: 160 hp @ 6000 rpm
Torque: 160 ft-lbs @ 4250 rpm
Firing Order: 1-3-4-2
Compression Ratio: 10.0:1
Fuel System: MFI
Fuel Required: Premium unleaded
Spark Plug Gap: 1.0-1.1mm
(0.039-0.043 in.)
Curb Idle Speed: 800 [+ or -] 100 rpm
Ignition Timing: 5 degrees [+ or -] 3 degrees BTDC
@curb idle
Fuel Pressure Regulator: 47.6 psi

Valve Timing
Intake Valve Opens(BTDC) 18*
Closes(ABDC) 62*
Exhaust Valve Opens(BBDC) 63*
Closes(ATDC) 21*

Intake Duration: 260
Exhaust Duration: 264

Cam ID Marks: Intake- 'K'[9.3mm lift] or 'G'[10mm lift]
Exhaust- 'H'[8.5mm lift] or 'G'[9.5mm lift]



Valve Clearance: Int & Exh-Hyd.
Capacities:
Cooling system-7.0L (7.4 Qt)
Fuel tank-64L (16.9 Gal)
Oil (w/filter)-4.3L (4.7 Qt)

Fluid Specs:
Engine Oil-API SG or SG/CD,
SAE 5W-30 to 20W-50(*)
M/T-API GL-4, SAE 75W-90 or
75W-85W(*)
A/T-Diamond ATF SP or equiv.
Brake-DOT-3 or 4
Power Steering-Dexron II
(*) Check owner's manual

Chassis Specs
Drivetrain: Transverse eng., FWD
Electrical System:
Battery-12V, 52 Ah
Alternator-12V, 75 A
Brake Sys.: Power assisted 4-wheel
disc, optional ABS
Lug Nut Torque: 88-108 Nm
(65-80 ft-lbs)
Suspension System:
Front-Multi-link with upper A-arm,
coil spring, 19mm stab. bar
Rear-Multi-link with upper A-arm,
dual lower control arms, trailing
arm, 12mm stabilizer bar

Front Alignment Specs:
Toe-In-0 [+ or -] 3mm (0 [+ or -] 0.12 in.)
Camber-0 degrees 00' [+ or -] 30'
Caster-4 degrees 20' [+ or -] 1 degrees 30'
Steering angle-Inner wheel 39 degrees 00'
[+ or =] 2 degrees, Outer wheel 30 degrees 30'
Rear Alignment Specs:
Toe-In-3 [+ or -] 3mm (0.12 [+or -] 0.12 in.)
Camber-N 1 degree 20'[+ or -] 30'


Technical Notes

With its current redesign of the Galant, Mitsubishi has placed the emphasis on durability, reliability and safety items. For those who want more git in their Galant, the GS offers a more powerful DOHC, higher compression, 160 hp variant of the base 2.4L 4-cyl., and a firmer suspension compliments of beefier stabilizer bars. Both engines have hydraulic lifters, roller rockers and dual balance shafts.

Besides being family cars, models in this segment are given the added requirement of being fun to drive. Mitsubishi has given the new Galant a more refined suspension system than the MacPherson struts usually found in this segment. The new design includes 4-wheel multi-link suspension. The front suspension consists of an upper A-arm, two lower transverse links and an upright link (knuckle), connecting the upper and lower control arms, to which the wheel hub is mounted. The shock and coil spring assembly is connected to the shock tower at the top and the lower lateral arm at the bottom.

The rear suspension attaches to a one-piece crossmember and consists of a lower arm, toe control arm, trailing arm which locates the lower arm, knuckle and upper arm. The shock and coil spring assembly arrangement is similar to the front except that it is connected to the knuckle at the bottom.

As for the 93-96 Mighty Max's with the 2.4l
Base Number of Cylinders: 4 Base Engine Size: 2.4 liters
Base Engine Type: Inline 4 Horsepower: 116 hp
Max Horsepower: 5000 rpm Torque: 136 ft-lbs.
Max Torque: 3500 rpm Maximum Payload: 1585 lbs.
Maximum Towing Capacity: 3500 lbs. Drive Type: RWD
Turning Circle: 35.4 ft.

this was the best I could locate

_________________
93' Max, 4g64, 16v DOHC, 18G Turbo, Walbro 255L, 27" FMIC, 2.5" Exhaust, Aero Exhaust, AEM C2DI w/COP, 510cc Injectors, Running on Megasquirt 3-X.

Videos as soon as it's 100% up and running.
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DarkSidEclipse
PostPosted: Tue Oct 12, 2010 12:48 pm  Reply with quote
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Joined: 12 Oct 2010
Posts: 1

Just wanted to point out that the Lancer Ralliart actually has the 4g69 engine also used in 2006 and newer Eclipse's. I can get you the specs on the engine if you want them
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